Past Postings

Previous William Thomas Sherman Info Page postings, quotes, observations, etc.

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"Soon after the year 1500, Lilly, the famous grammarian, who had learned Greek at Rhodes, and had afterwards acquired a polished Latinity at Rome under Johannes Sulpicius and Pomponius Sabinus, became the first teacher of Greek at any public school in England. This was a Saint Paul's school in London, then newly established by Dean Colet, and celebrated by Erasmus; and of which Lilly, as one of the most exact and accomplished scholars of his age, was appointed the first master. And that ancient prejudices were now gradually wearing off, and a national taste for critical studies and the graces of composition began to be diffused, appears from this circumstance alone; that from the year 1503 to the Reformation, there were more grammar schools, most of which at present are perhaps of little and importance, founded and endowed in England, than had been for three hundred years before. The practice of educating our youth in the monasteries growing into disuse, near twenty new grammar schools were established within this period: and among these, [cardinal] Wolsey's school at Ipswich, which soon fell a sacrifice to the resentment or the avarice of Henry the Eighth, deserves particular notice, as it rivalled those of Winchester and Eton...So attached was Wolsey to the new modes of instruction, that he did not think it inconsistent with his high office and rank, to publish a general address to the schoolmasters of England, in which he orders them to institute their youth in the most elegant literature. It is to be wished that all his edicts had been employed to so liberal and useful a purpose. There is an anecdote on record, which strongly marks Wolsey's character in this point of view, Notwithstanding his habits of pomp, he once condescended to be a spectator of a Latin tragedy of Dido, from Virgil, acted by the scholars of St. Paul's school, and written by John Rightwise, the master, an eminent grammarian. But Wolsey might have pleaded the authority of [pope] Leo X., who more than once had been present at one of these classical spectacles."
~ Thomas Warton, The History of English Poetry , vol. IV, sec. XXXVI.

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"...I wasted time, and now doth time waste me."

A: What are YOU doing HERE?

C: He said he didn't want to go to school.

A: Oh I see he's been listening to the magician again.

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If I were to venture a guess, Cortana talking to the computer probably derives from (someone like) the magician speaking regularly in somebody's head: that extra thinking companion if you will for the brainless and irrational.

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There is anti-virus and anti-malware for the computer, but not society.

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[Ch. 12]
...You put Christians on crosses and stakes: what image is not formed from the clay in the first instance, set on cross and stake? The body of your god is first consecrated on the gibbet. You tear the sides of Christians with your claws; but in the case of your own gods, axes, and planes, and rasps are put to work more vigorously on every member of the body. We lay our heads upon the block; before the lead, and the glue, and the nails are put in requisition, your deities are headless. We are cast to the wild beasts, while you attach them to Bacchus, and Cybele, and Cælestis. We are burned in the flames; so, too, are they in their original lump. We are condemned to the mines; from these your gods originate. We are banished to islands; in islands it is a common thing for your gods to have their birth or die. If it is in this way a deity is made, it will follow that as many as are punished are deified, and tortures will have to be declared divinities. But plain it is these objects of your worship have no sense of the injuries and disgraces of their consecrating, as they are equally unconscious of the honours paid to them. O impious words! O blasphemous reproaches! Gnash your teeth upon us— foam with maddened rage against us— you are the persons, no doubt, who censured a certain Seneca speaking of your superstition at much greater length and far more sharply! In a word, if we refuse our homage to statues and frigid images, the very counterpart of their dead originals, with which hawks, and mice, and spiders are so well acquainted, does it not merit praise instead of penalty, that we have rejected what we have come to see is error? We cannot surely be made out to injure those who we are certain are nonentities. What does not exist, is in its nonexistence secure from suffering.
~ Tertullian (c.155–c.240 AD), Apology

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[ch. 11]
And since, as you dare not deny that these deities of yours once were men, you have taken it on you to assert that they were made gods after their decease, let us consider what necessity there was for this. In the first place, you must concede the existence of one higher God — a certain wholesale dealer in divinity, who has made gods of men. For they could neither have assumed a divinity which was not theirs, nor could any but one himself possessing it have conferred it on them. If there was no one to make gods, it is vain to dream of gods being made when thus you have no god-maker. Most certainly, if they could have deified themselves, with a higher state at their command, they never would have been men. If, then, there be one who is able to make gods, I turn back to an examination of any reason there may be for making gods at all; and I find no other reason than this, that the great God has need of their ministrations and aids in performing the offices of Deity...
~ Tertullian (c.160–220 AD), Apology

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A: We said we would suffer you, didn't we?

B: But that isn't enough. I want you to like me too.

A: [Pause, looking at each other] That's impossible.

B: All right then be prepared to have all of your lives completely ruined and torn apart by scandal. I have it in my power to do this.

A: [Again looking at each other] We know.

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You think that person is God or at least a god, but let me ask you this. How many people do know (particularly thinking people) that actually like him?

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I know it is hard to believe, but sometimes everybody (or what we think of as "everybody") is wrong.

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Proven to be nothing better than a crackpot and a fanatic.

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If it didn't work out for Jesus, it damn sure isn't going to work out for you.

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Imagine if Jesus actually were dead.

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Heaven can help us all the better the more we are like them. And after all, if a man can become more of a devil, why can't he become more of an angel? But what is Heaven. Well, try this definition: Heaven is what Hell is not (i.e., not lying, cheating, bullying, pretending, etc.)

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When society invests in devils (and they do, the way some athletes spend money on steroids), it makes it harder for those who would be virtuous to stay in business.

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[On 2 Cor. v. 16. “And if we have known Christ after the flesh.”]

And so far, he says, no one any longer lives after the flesh. For that is not life, but death. For Christ also, that He might show this, ceased to live after the flesh. How? Not by putting off the body! Far be it! For with it as His own He shall come, the Judge of all. But by divesting Himself of physical affections, such as hunger, and thirst, and sleep, and weariness. For now He has a body incapable of suffering and of injury.

As “after the flesh” in our case is being in the midst of sins, and being out of them is to be “not after the flesh;” so also after the flesh, in the case of Christ, was His subjection to natural affections, and not to be subject to them was not to be “after the flesh.” “But,” he says, “as He was released, so also are we.” Let there be no longer, he says, subjection to the influences of the flesh.
~ Clement of Alexandria (c.150–c.215), Fragments

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